Postgraduate research funding

The School's postgraduate community is one of the largest and most diverse and dynamic postgraduate communities in the UK, and is committed to supporting financially the best-qualified applicants.

Funding your programme will be a crucial factor in your decision to apply for a postgraduate research degree, so the earlier you consider your funding options, the better.

Each year, we award over £1 million in studentships and bursaries for doctoral study. There is a range of awards on offer for both home/EU and international students at PhD level. 

Search for funding opportunities

Choose your country and programme of study to search our postgraduate research funding opportunities database. Alternatively, you can view funding opportunities for all of our School's programmes.

NWCDTP CDA: Early Modern Cultures of Reading in North West England

Early Modern Cultures of Reading in North West England

SCHOOL OF ARTS, LANGUAGES AND CULTURES (UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER) and CHETHAM’S LIBRARY

Fully-Funded PhD Studentship (AHRC North West Consortium Doctoral Training Partnership)

Start date: Saturday, 1 October 2022
Duration: 3.5 years full-time (or part-time equivalent)

Closing date for applications: Wednesday, 23 February 2022

Interviews: Wednesday, 9 March 2022

 

Project Description: 

This fully-funded PhD project, run in collaboration between the University of Manchester and Chetham’s Library in Manchester, the oldest public library in Britain, aims to uncover the largely overlooked history of reading in the early modern North West of England through a study of annotated books in the collections of Chetham’s. It thus offers a timely corrective to the almost exclusive focus on London and the South East in academic scholarship on sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English literary culture. By looking at annotators from a variety of social, educational, cultural, and religious backgrounds in a single region of England, the project will ask what the significance of place was in the history of reading and to what extent regional identities affected how and why readers engaged with printed materials. The project will consist of a series of detailed studies of annotated books, combining close analysis of manuscript marginalia focused on the response of readers to the text and the sources and intellectual frameworks of their interpretation with a wider study of the lives of the annotators and their social, religious, and cultural milieux in the early modern North West of England. 

Through its unique partnership with one of the foremost cultural heritage collections in the North West of England, the project aims to contribute to the ongoing revitalisation of the literary culture of the area, furthering the agenda of Manchester as a UNESCO City of Literature to ‘recognise past, present and future: a strong cultural heritage, a vibrant and diverse contemporary cultural scene, and aspirations to extend culture to the next generation’. The PhD student will be fully integrated into the activities of Chetham’s Library, whose collection has been designated as one of national and international importance and which is accredited as a museum by the Arts Council. In addition to writing an academic thesis, the student will enhance catalogue descriptions of books with early modern ownership marks and annotations, develop the library’s engagement with non-academic audiences, and put together an exhibit on readers from the early modern North West. They will receive expert training in archival research, cataloguing, curating, and public engagement, including social media, from the library staff at Chetham’s.

 

Qualifications needed: 

An undergraduate degree at first/upper second-class level and a Master’s degree (either completed with an overall average of 65% or higher, with a minimum of 65% in the dissertation, or in the final year with an overall average of 65% or higher) in Early Modern English Literature, Early Modern History, or a cognate subject related to the project. Some training in palaeography and / or Latin is desirable. International students are required to have equivalent classifications; the NWCDTP bases its assessments of qualifications attained outside the UK on the British Council’s NARIC guide. Candidates with lower qualifications may be considered if they can demonstrate that relevant professional practice or work experience has equipped them with equivalent academic and research skills. The NWCDTP is committed to equality, diversity and inclusion and to widening participation in doctoral research. We particularly welcome applications from students from underrepresented communities and from non-traditional academic backgrounds.

 

Eligibility

Both home and international students are eligible to apply. 

To be classed as a home student, candidates must meet the following criteria: 

    • Be a UK National (meeting residency requirements), or
    • Have settled status, or
    • Have pre-settled status (meeting residency requirements), or
    • Have indefinite leave to remain or enter. 

If a candidate does not meet the criteria above, they will be classed as an international student.

For full details on eligibility refer to UKRI guidance.

 

Funding: 

The successful candidate will receive: 

  • Payment of academic fees, at the standard RCUK home fee rate, for 3.5 years. The University of Manchester is committed to cover the remaining fees should an international student be the successful candidate.
  • Maintenance Stipend (£16,159 in 2021/22) for 3.5 years.
  • Access to a Research Training Support Grant (RTSG) fund for research related expenses including conference attendance, fieldwork expenses. 
  • Access to Overseas Institutional Visits (OIV) and Placements.
  • Access to a Cohort Development Fund (CDF) to support the wider cohort in organising events such as conferences, workshops, public engagement events, etc.

 

How to Apply:

Applicants should email to fred.schurink@manchester.ac.uk the following by midnight on Wednesday, 23 February 2022: 

  • Academic CV (max. 2 pages) including two named referees, one of whom should be your most recent academic tutor/supervisor. Referees will be contacted if you are shortlisted;
  • Copy of first degree and Master’s degree transcripts (or anticipated grade if applicable);
  • Letter of application (max. 2 pages) outlining your suitability for the studentship and how you would anticipate approaching the research.
  • A sample of your strongest written work (5,000 words maximum);
  • A NWCDTP Equality and Diversity data form

If your application is successful, you will be asked to apply formally for a PhD place at The University of Manchester. Instructions will follow.

 

You will work with the following team of supervisors: 

Dr Fred Schurink, The University of Manchester;

Prof. Sasha Handley, The University of Manchester;

Dr Fergus Wilde, Librarian at Chetham’s Library.

 

For further information, please email fred.schurink@manchester.ac.uk.

Understanding attacks on aid workers and delivery (fully funded ESRC CASE Studentship with Insecurity Insight)

Understanding attacks on aid workers and delivery (fully funded ESRC CASE Studentship with Insecurity Insight)

 

Anticipated start date for project:

September 2022

 

Closing date for applications:

Wednesday, 23 March 2022

 

MSc and PhD Studentship Funding

We are seeking applications for a full time, fully-funded ESRC 1+3 CASE studentship to pursue an MSc in Social Research Methods and Statistics and a PhD in Humanitarian and Conflict Response, both at the University of Manchester. The studentship includes academic tuition-fees, an annual Maintenance Stipend (£15,609 in 2021/22, exact rate for 2022/23 subject to confirmation from UKRI) and access to a Research Training Support Grant (RTSG) for reimbursement of research related expenses including, but not limited to: conference attendance, training courses and fieldwork. The successful applicant will also have the opportunity to engage with a wider cohort of postgraduate researchers via the North West Social Science Doctoral Training Partnership (NWSSDTP).

 

Project description:

This project will make a critical interdisciplinary and methodological contribution to the study of violence against aid workers and aid delivery. This type of violence has risen, with attacks ranging from threats to theft of supplies, intimidation at checkpoints, and the wounding or death of aid workers. The dynamics and causes of such violence, however, remain understudied. To date, a dearth of accessible empirical data has hampered analysis. While this is improving, significant methodological issues exist. Together these provide significant opportunities to contribute to theoretical and methodological understanding of this type of violence and its impact, and to contribute to policy-relevant research.

 

The project will enable the exploitation of a new longitudinal, disaggregated dataset about attacks against aid workers and aid delivery (the Security in Numbers Database, SiND), employing Advanced Quantitative Methods. The SiND dataset offers detailed micro-level data about a range of attacks on aid workers and aid delivery for over 14000 events dating to the mid-1990s from more than 70 countries. The project asks theoretical and methodological questions such as:

  • What factors explain the spatial and temporal distribution of attacks on aid workers at the global, national, and sub-national levels?
  • What logics and motivations underlie different types of attacks? How do these differ among perpetrators?
  • What factors influence the risk of violent incidents, including gender, location, staff nationality, occupational group, and programme type, once the incident rate is well specified?
  • How can model averaging be used to compare and merge models with alternative operationalisation of the dependent variable, the ‘incident rate’ or risk of incidents?

 

To maximise the potential for impact on humanitarian response, the project is a partnership with Insecurity Insight. The student will have the opportunity to engage in policy-relevant research and analysis, working with Insecurity Insight.

 

Supervisors:

  • Professor Larissa Fast (Humanitarian and Conflict Response Institute, The University of Manchester)
  • Professor Wendy Olsen (Department of Social Statistics, The University of Manchester)
  • Christina Wille (Director, Insecurity Insight).

 

Qualifications applicants should have/be expected to receive:

  • Undergraduate honours degree at first or upper second-class level (or international equivalent)
  • Where applicable, suitable master’s degree at upper Merit level or above (or international equivalent), or appropriate progress towards it, in Humanitarian Studies, Peace and Conflict Studies, Development Studies, Politics, Sociology or a related discipline

 

Person Specification

  • We are looking for an outstanding PhD candidate for this research who must have strong analytical skills, and knowledge and experience in quantitative research methods, or a willingness to learn these methods. (Project-specific training requirements will be available through the MSc and additional methods training)
  • Previous work and/or research experience in the aid sector and humanitarian response
  • Experience in data management, particularly data cleaning and processing is desirable
  • An interest in, and commitment to, translating academic research into practitioner and policy-oriented knowledge is essential

 

Eligibility restriction:

Open to home and International (including EU and EEA) candidates

Candidates must meet the eligibility criteria set out in the NWSSDTP 1+3 Application Guidance document available on the How to apply and Case studentships webpages.

 

Contact for further information:

For further information about the project and all enquiries, please contact Professor Larissa Fast (larissa.fast@manchester.ac.uk)

 

How to apply:

Applicants should email the following to Professor Larissa Fast (larissa.fast@manchester.ac.uk) by Wednesday, 23 March 2022 at 5pm GMT:

 

  • An academic CV (maximum four pages)
  • Names and contact details of two academic referees who can comment on your suitability for PhD study and to undertake the advertised project
  • If relevant, a copy of your first degree and Master’s degree transcripts (or anticipated grade if masters is on-going)
  • A letter of application (maximum one page) outlining your suitability for the CASE studentship and how you would anticipate approaching the research. Please include information about your relevant work or research experience, and any technical/quantitative skills

 

Interviews for shortlisted candidates will take place on Friday, 1 April 2022. Note that the successful candidate will be required to submit an online application for a place on the MSc in Social Research and Statistics and the PhD in Humanitarianism and Conflict Response programme based on the project brief by mid-April 2022, with the support of the supervisors.

PhD loans (UK/EU students only)

PhD loans (UK/EU students only)

The UK Government has now published information on PhD student loans. 

  • You can borrow up to £25,000 for the entire PhD programme.
  • UK nationals who are ordinarily resident in England, aged 59 or under, who are not already receiving funding via a UK Research Council, will be eligible. The Government is currently considering making EU students eligible.
  • The loan is paid directly to students and can be used for tuition fees and living costs.
  • The loan is divided equally across each year of the programme in three instalments.

Find out more 

AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership (CDP) studentship

AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership (CDP) studentship - Crown Engagement in Britain’s Emerging Empire, 1660-1775

Start date: 1 October 2022

Application Deadline: 29 April 2022

The University of Manchester and Historic Royal Palaces are pleased to announce the availability of a fully funded Collaborative doctoral studentship from October 2022 under the AHRC’s Collaborative Doctoral Partnership Scheme.

This project will be jointly supervised by Dr Edmond Smith, Presidential Fellow in Economic Cultures, University of Manchester and Dr Misha Ewen, Curator for Inclusive History, Historic Royal Palaces, and the student will be expected to spend time at both at the University of Manchester and Historic Royal Palaces as well as becoming part of the wider cohort of CDP funded students across the UK. The studentship can be studied either full or part-time.

We encourage the widest range of potential students to study for this CDP studentship and are committed to welcoming students from different backgrounds to apply. We particularly welcome applications from underrepresented communities and from non-traditional academic backgrounds,as they are currently underrepresented at this level in this area.  Students should have a master’s degree in a relevant subject or can demonstrate equivalent experience in a professional setting.

Project Description

This CDP project will explore how the royal family functioned as an integral part of the institutional structures that underpinned Britain’s economic and imperial development in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, granting charters, patents, and monopolies to projects that attracted their support. During this period, they formed part of a tripartite system of economic and imperial oversight that included the crown, the court, and, increasingly, parliament. Yet, despite the crown’s direct support for chartered trading companies, or for the establishment of so-called ‘crown colonies’ in the Americas, studies of Britain’s emerging empire rarely consider precisely how the royal family understood or participated in these activities.

This CDP project will examine the royal role in empire by bringing together personal papers and state documents with the experience of royals in their courtly spaces.

Key research questions include

  • What was the role of the royal family in imperial developments?
  • What agency did royals have in the creation and support of new institutional paradigms?
  • How did their lives at court within the royal palaces shape how they understood Britain’s emerging empire and their place within it?

For further information, please email edmond.smith@manchester.ac.uk or misha.ewen@hrp.org.uk

Details of Award

CDP doctoral training grants fund full-time studentships for 45 months (3.75 years) or part-time equivalent. The studentship has the possibility of being extended for an additional 3 months to provide professional development opportunities, or up to 3 months of funding may be used to pay for the costs the student might incur in taking up professional development opportunities.     

The award pays tuition fees up to the value of the full-time home UKRI rate for PhD degrees. Research Councils UK Indicative Fee Level for 2022/23 is £4,596.

The award pays full maintenance for all students both home and international students. The National Minimum Doctoral Stipend for 2022/23 is £16,062, plus a maintenance payment of £550/year paid to all CDP students, and an additional allowance of £1000/year to support travel between the university and Historic Royal Palaces sites in London.

The student will have access to a Research Training Support Grant (RTSG) fund for research related expenses including conference attendance, fieldwork expenses through the University of Manchester.

The student is also eligible to receive an additional travel and related expenses grant during the course of the project courtesy of Historic Royal Palaces worth up to £850 per year for 3.75 years (45 months).

The successful candidate will be eligible to participate in CDP Cohort Development events.

The project can be undertaken on a full-time or part-time basis.

Qualifications

An undergraduate degree at first/upper second-class level and a either a Master’s degree (either completed with an overall average of 65% or higher, with a minimum of 65% in the dissertation, or in the final year with an overall average of 65% or higher) or be able to demonstrate equivalent experience in a professional setting. International students are required to have equivalent classifications or professional experience. Suitable disciplines are flexible, but might include: Early Modern History, Imperial History, Economic History, Heritage Studies or a cognate subject related to the project. The University of Manchester bases its assessments of qualifications attained outside the UK on the British Council’s NARIC guide.

Applicants must be able to demonstrate an interest in the cultural heritage and museums sector and demonstrate potential and enthusiasm for developing skills more widely in related areas. As a collaborative award, students will be expected to spend time at both the University of Manchester and Historic Royal Palaces.

We want to encourage the widest range of potential students to study for a CDP studentship and are committed to welcoming students from a wide variety of background to apply. The University of Manchester and Historic Royal Palaces are committed to equality, diversity and inclusion and to widening participation in doctoral research. We particularly welcome applications from students from underrepresented communities and from non-traditional academic backgrounds.

Eligibility

Both home and international students are eligible to apply. 

To be classed as a home student, candidates must meet the following criteria: 

  • Be a UK National (meeting residency requirements), or
  • Have settled status, or
  • Have pre-settled status (meeting residency requirements), or
  • Have indefinite leave to remain or enter. 

If a candidate does not meet the criteria above, they will be classed as an international student.

How to Apply

Applicants should email  edmond.smith@manchester.ac.uk and misha.ewen@hrp.org.uk the following information by midnight on 29 April 2022:

  • Academic CV (max. 2 pages) including two named references, one of whom should be your most recent academic tutor/supervisor. Referees will be contacted if you are shortlisted;
  • Letter of application (max. 2 pages) outlining your suitability for the studentship and how you would anticipate approaching the research;
  • Copy of first degree and Master’s degree transcripts (if applicable);
  • A sample of your strongest written work (5,000 words maximum);
  • A NWCDTP Equality and Diversity data form

If your application is successful, you will be asked to apply formally for a PhD place at the University of Manchester. Instructions will follow.

 

Postgraduate Doctoral Loans Explained