Search
Search type

Religions and Theology

STIMW - The Sanskrit Tradition in the Modern World

Friday, 25 May 2018, 10.45am-5pm - The University of Manchester

The 35th Annual STIMW Symposium

STIMW banner with script that translates as 'The ancient bards have walked in a newer step - Rg Veda 9, 23, 2'

This year’s STIMW programme and abstracts are now available below. STIMW offers a forum for the discussion of papers on varied aspects of Indian religions. Papers have been presented by leading scholars in the field as well as by research students.  Papers are sent to participants in advance, so that they can be read and discussed in detail.  They are available to those who cannot attend for a small charge.

For further information about STIMW, please contact:

Dr Jacqueline Suthren Hirst
Religions and Theology
Samuel Alexander Building
The University of Manchester
Oxford Road
Manchester
M13 9PL

For further information or to join the STIMW mailing list, please email jacqueline.hirst@manchester.ac.uk.

Previous STIMW programmes

Previous conferences and symposia

The 34th Annual STIMW Symposium

The University of Manchester - Friday, 26 May 2017

The 33rd Annual STIMW Symposium

The University of Manchester - Friday, 27 May 2016

The 32nd Annual STIMW Symposium

The University of Manchester - Friday, 29 May 2015

The 31st Annual STIMW Symposium

The University of Manchester - Friday, 23 May 2014

The 30th Annual STIMW Symposium

The University of Manchester - Friday, 31 May 2013

29th Annual STIMW Symposium

The University of Manchester - Friday, 25 May 2012

  • Programme for STIMW 2012

Abstracts from STIMW 2012:

  • Dharma in Dialogue: encountering the other in the Mahabharata
  • Religious Sects, Syncretism, and Claims of Antiquity: The Dasanami-Samnyasis And South Asian Sufis
  • Vaishnava Sannyasis in Modernity: their lives and challenges
  • Scholastic Subjectivities: Sancrit Textual Practices and the Discursive Formation of Religious Identity in Gujarat
  • A Sanskrit Treasure Trove in East Anglia: the Manuscripts Collection of the Cambridge University Library

28th Annual STIMW Symposium

The University of Manchester - Friday, 27 May 2011

  • Programme for STIMW 2011

27th Annual STIMW Symposium

The University of Manchester - Friday, 28 May 2010

  • Programme for STIMW 2010

26th Annual STIMW Seminar

The University of Manchester - Friday, 29 May 2009 

Programme:

  • Laurie L Patton (Emory University) - 'Notes on women and Vedic learning in the 21st century'
  • James Madaio (University of Manchester) - Research report: 'Studying spoken Sanskrit'
  • Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad (University of Lancaster) - 'What is the self to argue over? A perspective from Advaita Vedanta'
  • Kiyokazu Okita (University of Oxford/University of Hamburg) - 'Recovering the Sacred Immanence: ecological implications of Vaishnava Vedanta'
  • Lynn Thomas (Roehampton University, London) - 'Progeny, gift and gender: rethinking the story of Agastya and Lopamudra'

Sanskrit Tradition in the Modern World: Panel 15 of the European Conference for Modern South Asian Studies

STIMW 2008

Programme

  • Maya Warrier (University of Wales, Lampeter) - 'The transmission of tradition: Ayurvedic training in the UK'
  • Malathy A (Dept of English, Indira Gandhi National Open University, New Delhi) - 'The Sanskrit critical tradition and contemporary discourse: instances from India critical practice'.
  • Guzel Strelkova (Institute of Asian and African Studies, Moscow State University) - 'Kadambari in the modern world'.
  • Kiyokazu Okita (Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies) - 'New conflicts, old roots: the Suksmatika on the first opening verse of the Govindabhasya of Baladeva Vidyabhusana'.
  • Sharada Sugirtharajah (University of Birmingham) - 'What makes a good city? a Hindu perspective'.
  • Hazel Collinson (University of Manchester) - 'Dreams and optical disorders: Kumarila's reinterpretation and refutation of Vasubandhu'.

24th Annual STIMW Seminar

The University of Manchester - Friday, 25 May 2007

Programme

  • McComas Taylor (Australian National University) - 'The current renaissance of Sanskrit in India'
  • Payal Doctor (University of Liverpool) - Research report: 'The tradition of Sanskrit commentaries and their future'
  • Dermot Killingley (University of Newcastle-Upon-Tyne) - 'Ezour Vedam: Europe's illusory first glimpse of the Veda'
  • Jacqueline Suthren Hirst (University of Manchester) - 'The six schools of Indian Philosophy: some Indian and European constructions'
  • Annapurna Waughray (Manchester Metropolitan University) - 'Caste discrimination and human rights law'

STIMW was first convened by Dr Dermot Killingley at the University of Newcastle in 1984. Since then, under his able leadership and that of Dr Will Sweetman, STIMW has offered a forum for the discussion of many aspects of Indian religions. Over the past two decades, papers have been presented by leading scholars in the field as well as by research students in the University of Newcastle and elsewhere. We hope that STIMW's new location in Manchester, with its growing programmes in South Asian Studies and Centre for Applied South Asian Studies, will encourage participants old and new to support this friendly symposium.

23rd Annual STIMW Seminar

The University of Manchester - Friday, 26 May 2006

Programme

  • Mandakranta Bose (Vancouver) - 'What happened to Sita's voice? The Portrayal of Sita in three Bengali Ramayana'
  • Matthew Clark (SOAS) - 'Sankaracarya and the Founding of Four Monasteries'
  • George Gheverghese Joseph (Manchester) - 'Researching Historical Links between Kerala and the Vatican: A Case Study'
  • Hazel Collinson (PhD student Manchester) - Research report on consciousness in Vasubandhu
  • Vivienne Baumfield (Newcastle) - 'Vivekananda's Practical Vedanta and American Pragmatism: influence, support or coincidence
  • Mark Singleton (Cambridge) - 'From Superman to Shaktiman: Nietzsche, Yoga and Spiritual Darwinism'

STIMW - instructions for contributors

Full papers

  • Papers are pre-circulated so that participants can read them before the seminar to ensure the best possible use of discussion time. Papers are therefore not read out at the seminar itself. Each full paper will be allocated 40 minutes of discussion time. The paper will be briefly introduced by the person chairing the session, who will then raise questions to the paper-giver, before opening the discussion.
  • Papers should be no longer than 20 pp, A4, including notes and references, and should be presented in a font size no smaller than Times New Roman 12 point. Line spacing should be no less than 1.5. (Papers will be reduced for photocopying).
  • To facilitate discussion for those short of reading time, paper-givers should provide a one page abstract of the key argument of the paper, along with their paper. Please include your email address for further feedback.

Research reports

  • These give postgraduate students and others at the beginning of a research project the opportunity to offer a briefer report in order to gain feedback on its direction and approach.
  • Research Reports, also pre-circulated, will be allocated 15 minutes of discussion time. In this case, the chair will introduce the report presenter who will then briefly summarise his or her own research together with the questions the presenter would like the audience to comment on. The chair will then open the discussion to all present.
  • Research Reports should be no longer than 8 pp, A4, and should be presented in a font size no smaller than Times New Roman 12 point. Line spacing should be no less than 1.5.
  • To facilitate discussion, report presenters should provide a one page abstract of the main lines of their research and the key questions they would like addressed. Please include your email address for further feedback.

Chairing

  • The chair of each main session will be responsible for introducing the paper-giver and paper in no more than 5 minutes, in initiating a discussion with the paper-giver (15 mins max) and in ensuring there is ample time for discussion from the floor (at least 20 mins).
  • In the case of Research Reports, the chair's job is to introduce the candidate and to ensure that all comments from the floor are heard where possible.
  • Since the programme is packed, it is vital that chairs time-keep efficiently.

Deadlines for submission