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English Literature and Creative Writing

Current PhD students

PhD students in English Literature and Creative Writing pursue a wide range of different topics, from Anglo-Saxon poetry to the contemporary novel. Here's what some of our current students are researching:

  • Fatema Abdoolcarim – '"Hum": A Film about Loss and the Longing to Return'
  • Afaf Al-Humaidi – ‘Cosmopolitanism and Islamic Feminism’
  • Liliana Bajger – ‘Spheres of Presence and Absence’
  • Alexandra Bennett – ‘Modernist Afterlives: Temporality and Experimentation’
  • Katharina Boeckenhoff - 'Border Crossings and Constructions of Sexuality in Modernist Fiction'
  • Sarah Bolger – ‘Frustrated Autonomy in Female Identity Formation: Irish Women Writers and Gendered Subordination in Twenty-First Century Fiction’
  • Christina Brennan – ‘Palimpsest and Protest: Genre, Activism and Resistance in Post-Iraq War Literatures’
  • Lucy Burns – ‘Twentieth-Century Dream-Poetry’
  • Chad Campbell – ‘A Contemporary Poetry of Witness'
  • Julie Casanova – ‘Time, Space and Female Identity: The Aesthetics of Displacement in Victorian Women's Poetry’
  • Yulin Chen – ‘The Invention of History: The Engagement and Construction of the Past by Lesbian Writers of the late 20th Century’
  • Federica Coluzzi – ‘The Origins and Development of the English Hermeneutic Tradition and Hermeneutical Appropriations of Dante Alighieri's Divina Commedia between the Mid-Victorian Age and Early Modernism (1860-1935)’
  • Annie Dickinson – ‘The Malcontent in Early Modern Drama’
  • Kathryn Dixon – ‘A Feminist Study of Barbara Hepworth'
  • Imogen Durant – ‘The Progressive Verse of ASJ Tessimond and Dawson Jackson’
  • David Firth – ‘A Postcolonial Voice: Freedom and Cosmopolitanism in the Works of Nadine Gordimer’
  • Thomas Froh - 'The decline of libertinism in the late eighteenth century: Analysing English and French libertine novels'
  • Zoe Gosling – ‘Mathematics and Modernism’
  • Eleanor Green – ‘Queering Intercourses in Beckett and Contemporary Theory’
  • James Green – ‘Reading Medievally in 'Ulysses' and 'Finnegans Wake”
  • Selina Guinness – ‘The Ethics of Countenancing Self and Other in W.B. Yeats and Elizabeth Bowen'
  • Charlotte Haines – ‘The Nine Lives of Jeopardy Jones'
  • Laura Hair – ‘The Construction of a Gendered Shame Complex in Edna O'Brien and John McGahern’
  • Lucy Hanks – ‘Mediated Expression: Self-Censorship in Nineteenth-Century Women's Manuscripts’
  • Louisa Hann – ‘AIDS, Neoliberalism and Political Theatre after Angels in America’
  • David Hartley – “Fly' and the Fantastic Acoustic: Narrative Constructions of ASD in Speculative Fiction and Film'
  • Tessa Harris – ‘The Winifred Stories'
  • David Hobbs – ‘Prison Writing & Post-War British Culture’
  • Masashi Hoshino – ‘Realistic and Utopian Aspects in 1930s British Literature’
  • Rebecca Hurst – “Lost in the forest of dreams': Collected Poems: Exploring the Domestic Spaces and Wild Places of Russian and Soviet Literary Fairy Tales'
  • Rena Jackson - 'Class and Empire in the Prose Works of Thomas Hardy'
  • Joanna Jones – ‘D.H. Lawrence and the French Cultural and Literary Tradition: Presentations of Male Bisexuality and Androgyny’
  • Rosemary Kay – ‘Fictionalising Real People in Creative Media and Literature: How Creating Characters based on Real People Influences the Quality and Validity of a Piece of Imaginative Fiction'
  • Susan Kinnear – ‘A Re-Balancing Act: Cultural Pioneering in New Zealand Literature, 1905 to 1969’
  • Rachel Kirkwood – ‘Stand Still in the Light: 17th Century Quakers' Metaphorical Conceptualisation of the Interface between the Human and the Divine’
  • Stian Kristensen – ‘Contemporary Responses to HIV and AIDS in Gay Male Literature’
  • Katherine Lowe – ‘Collaborative Printing in Early Modern England (1500-1550)’
  • Usma Malik – ‘Translating Memory Narratives'
  • Eva-Maria Mosser – ‘The Concept of Spatiality: A Contrastive Analysis of Travelogues and Captivity Narratives as forms of Travel Literature’
  • Sarah Newport – ‘Hijras in Context: The Role of Indian History in Shaping Representations of India's Hirja Community’
  • Nathaniel Ogle – ‘Narrative Parallax: A Novel and Critical Dissertation Exploring Multiple Narrative Perspectives'
  • Nell Osborne – ‘Towards a Theory of Writing: Gender, Subjectivity and Poetics in the Work of Ann Quin’
  • Sima Parker – ‘Re-Claiming The Self: The Analysis of the Body in Illness and Suicide Narratives’
  • Gillian Redfern – ‘Back to the Future? Look North - It's Positively Medieval’
  • Joseph Reed – ‘Ekphrasis and the Economic Order. Wealth, Power and Art in the Work of Don DeLillo, Rachel Kushner, Tom McCarthy and Michel Houellebecq'
  • Laura Ryan – ‘D. H. Lawrence and the Harlem Renaissance’
  • Sabine Sharp – ‘Utopia and Dystopia: Reimagining Gender and Sexual Categories in Feminist Science Fiction’
  • Emma Shaw – ‘Pedestrian Resistance: Walking Women and Women Writers, 1907- 1951’
  • Jean-Marie Sherry – ‘Black Plumes and Nonsense: Victorian Responses to Tennyson's 'In Memoriam' and its Place in Victorian Grief Narratives and Mourning Culture’
  • William Simms – ‘Modern Obscenities: Modernist Texts in Court’
  • Claire Snook – ‘Swing Dance, Cultural Appropriation and Entertainment: Race and Historical Misunderstanding in Modern Dance'
  • Philip Sulter – ‘Violence, Vulnerability, and Corporeality: Tracing a "Trans-Global" History of Affect in Selected Fictions of the War on Terror’
  • Laura Swift – ‘Monstrous Bodies and the Uncanny City: Early Capitalism in Ben Johnson's London’
  • Grace Timperley – ‘The Young Hero in the Middle English Inheritance Romance, 1250 – 1510’
  • Christopher Vardy – ‘Historicizing Neoliberal Britain'
  • Eleanor Ward – ‘Writing about Disability Through Poetry - Tensions Between Social and Medical Understandings of the Body in Women's Contemporary Poetry'
  • Stephanie Warner – ‘Anxiety, Melancholy and the Experimental Lyric'
  • Mariah Whelan – ‘This Continuous Performance'
  • Hilary White – ‘Accommodating the Mess: New forms for the Novel in Experimental British Women's Fiction in the 1960s and '70s’
  • Fay Winfield – ‘Postcolonial Readings of Empire in BBC Adaptations of Victorian Novels’