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School of Arts, Languages and Cultures

Students on a Bronte trip to Haworth

Manchester International Summer School

Join us for a three-week course taking place in July which explores British culture and history, as well as contemporary Manchester and its region.

"Manchester is a place for individuals, brilliant kids who like to do their own thing… and if you are ready it will release you to do the same..."

The Virgin Guide to British Universities

The next Manchester International Summer School (MISS), based in the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures, takes place in July 2017. Applications will open in January.

Two hundred years ago the modern world began in Manchester. In this city, entrepreneurs and workers created the economic and political structures of modernity. Sumultaneously, political thinkers, social reformers, artists and writers sought to understand the significance of those changes. What happened in Manchester between 1750 and 1850 changed the world. MISS is your chance to explore and understand Manchester’s significance as a world-historical city.

MISS is a multi-disciplinary course which explores British culture and history through the prism of Manchester and its region. Do you want to know how industrialisation changed everything - from how we work and where we live, to what we do in our leisure time? Are you interested in the role played by Manchester and Liverpool in the development of British popular music? How football developed from a leisure pursuit to a multi-billion pound industry? How what happened in Manchester impacted on the Bronte sisters in Haworth? How the inhabitants of the 'real' Downton Abbey coped with these changes? Then this is the course for you.

At MISS you will explore Manchester through lectures and seminars with leading academics. You will be given an opportunity to develop a wide range of academic skills. Our Summer School is both intellectually challenging and pleasurable. We will take you to art galleries, museums, stately and historic homes, and show you the city's celebrated Victorian and modern architecture.

Courses

Below are the courses and trips that were available to students at the 2016 summer school. Some may change for July 2017 but this should give you a flavour of what to expect:

Courses overview

Three week residential stage

The Manchester Summer School (MISS) consists of a three week residential stage which is supported by pre- and post-residential phases. All dates will be confirmed in early 2017.

  • Pre-residential phase (June – July 2017)

This phase begins (for students accepted onto MISS) in June 2017 when you will receive your log-in details for Blackboard (our electronic learning environment). On Blackboard you will find your reading pack for the course. One week before the course begins you will be asked to take a short quiz designed to help you assess how prepared for the course you are. This quiz is also worth 10% of your final mark for the course.

  • Residential phase (July 2017)

The residential phase of MISS lasts for three weeks. During this time you will be taught by a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops and field-trips, including visits to places such as the Museum of Science and Industry (MOSI), Manchester City Art Gallery, the National Football Museum, Old Trafford, the Beatles Museum in Liverpool, the Bronte Parsonage in Haworth and Lyme Park (the stately home where the BBC filmed Pride and Prejudice).

  • Post-residential Phase (July – August 2017)

The post-residential phase consists of a four-week period designed to allow you to complete your Long Essay.

MISS is designed as a 20-credit course (20 UK credits, 5 US credits, or 10ECTS). To qualify for the 20-credits you must achieve an overall average of at least 40%. Students who fail the course will be entitled to re-sit the Long Essay assessment. Students holding a failing mark after the re-sit will, if eligible, be considered for an exit award of 10 credits. Students who do not attempt the Long Essay will be awarded a Certificate of Attendance.

It is your responsibility to check with your home institution about the transfer of credits.

In the three residential weeks, you will be studying some of the following courses:

Week 1

  • Manchester: Original / Modern

Week 2

Choose one of the following units:

  • The 'Real' Downton Abbey
  • The Beatles
  • Radical Manchester
  • Worlds of Sport
  • Britain, the Atlantic Slave Trade and Abolition

Week 3

Choose one of the following units:

  • The Brontes
  • From Cottonopolis to the Post-Industrial City 
  • Medicine, Modernity and Manchester
  • From Romanticism to Modernism
  • Streets, Shopping and Sanitation

During the three-week residential phase, students are expected to attend classes and field trips Monday - Friday each week. Free time is allocated in the evenings for study and social activities, and at the weekends independent travel is encouraged.

You will be asked to select your units for Week 2 and 3 prior to your arrival at Manchester. If you wish to change your choices please email the summer school team by Wednesday of week one. We will try to accommodation all requests subject to space on the course and the approval of the tutor.

Please note that courses are subject to change and may be updated nearer to the time.

Manchester: Original / Modern course

Manchester: Original / Modern

By Dr Christopher Godden 

What does your course cover?

This course looks at the development of Manchester as a global commercial and industrial city in the nineteenth century. A visitor travelling to Manchester in the mid-nineteenth century would have been confronted with an amazing sight. Beneath clouds of smoke billowing from factory chimneys lay a phenomenon – not simply a great city or commercial centre, but the citadel of industrial capitalism. Manchester’s position as a global city was created through her dominance of industry and technology and, most famously of all, cotton textiles. 

What fieldtrips will you take students on your course and why?

Students of the Manchester Summer School will get to spend a day at Quarry Bank Mill – one of Britain’s great industrial heritage sites, built in 1784 and now run by the National Trust. The mill and the surrounding area overflow with the atmosphere of the Industrial Revolution and, as part of a guided tour, students will gain insights into the progression of Britain’s economic development from the mediaeval era through to the nineteenth century. 

What will the students learn from this?

On one level, this course provides students with a unique opportunity to study the history of Manchester whilst studying history at Manchester! Looking beyond this, Manchester’s economic and social development in the nineteenth century is a multifaceted story that serves to inform important problems confronting the modern world. This course therefore provides students with an opportunity to study history to gain a critical perspective on current topics such as industrialization, urbanization, living standards, public health, and child labour.

The 'Real' Downton Abbey course

The 'Real' Downton Abbey

By Dr Elaine Tierney

What does your course cover?

The 'Real' Downton Abbey examines life within English country houses, charting their rise to prominence in the late seventeenth century to their decline in the twentieth century. We study who built these grand buildings and estates, when, where and why they built them, and how they worked as expressions of cultural, economic and political power. Moving inside these houses, we examine the lives of the people who lived there focusing on experiences of childbirth and education, to courtship, marriage and death. The changing relationship between masters and servants is an important focus throughout, alongside the experiences of servants themselves.

What field trips will you take students on your course and why?

To experience what life was really like in an English country house, students will visit Lyme Park in Cheshire. This grand estate was built as home to the Legh family for centuries before being taken over by the National Trust in the twentieth century. We explore life above stairs for the ladies and gentlemen of the house, life below stairs for the servants and the extensive grounds. The lake at Lyme Park was the setting for the BBC’s adaptation of Pride and Prejudice where Mr. Darcy plunged into the lake. Our second field trip is to the Manchester City Art Gallery to examine a wide range of historical objects and portraits that help us to imagine the everyday lives of people who lived in English country houses.

What will the students learn from this?

Students will develop an enhanced knowledge of English social history and social relations in the period c.1700-c.1930. They will forge a better understanding of the relationship between history, heritage, material culture and architecture and they will also gain a better understanding of gender relations in historical context.

The Beatles course

The Beatles

By Dr Kevin Malone and Sam Flynn

What does your course cover?

The course is an introduction to the musical development of the Beatles and the history, culture and technology that fed into their music and celebrity. We look at the musical influences from and exchanges with the USA in particular, and focus on the relationship between protest and art in the latter part of their career.

What fieldtrips will students on your course go on, and why?

No discussion of the Beatles is complete without a discussion of where they came from: Liverpool. Or is it? Why is Liverpool important to our understanding of the Beatles? Should it be? We’ll explore these questions by visiting the Beatles Story Museum in Liverpool, in order to gain a more nuanced understanding of the relationship between popular music and British history.

What will the students learn from this course?

You will learn about the stylistic characteristics of Blues, Rock and Roll and Psychedelic Rock. You will also learn about the cultural and political history of Britain in the postwar period, and especially in the 1960s. You will develop a sense of the complexity involved in studying the cultural history of popular music, and gain new skills in interpreting music in relation to its contexts.

Worlds of Sport course

Worlds of Sport

By Dr Ian Scott

What does your course cover?

Students will engage in a week-long examination of the history and legacy of British sport, as a global, national but especially local – to Manchester - phenomenon and interest. Covering aspects of social, cultural and political history, the course will trace the evolution of sports organisation, social change and cultural influence, primarily in the post-1945 period but with reference to earlier developments too. In addition, the course will also consider the North-West and wider national relationship to sport in North America, notably examining football/soccer and its links, influences and transnational exchange.

What fieldtrips will you take students on your course and why?

The students will get to visit the National Football Museum in Manchester, Old Trafford stadium, the home of Manchester United, as well as having the chance to experience ‘live’ sport in the form of cricket at Lancashire CCC at their national and internationally renowned Test Match ground, Old Trafford. Each visit provides students with a history of, and appreciation for, the fabric of sport interwoven into the North-West community and the importance of sport to the culture, economy and politics of the region.

What will the students learn from this?

At the close of the course students will have gained a renewed appreciation of sports history, various sporting legacies and influences upon British society and culture, and a wider understanding of the framework of North-West sport within the national and international context.

Radical Manchester course

Radical Manchester

By Dr Michael Sanders

What does your course cover?

This course explores three inspirational ways in which 'ordinary' people came together to make the world a better place. We look at the contribution which the Trade Unions, the Co-operative Movement and the Chartists (pioneers of democratic reform) have made to the making of the modern world.

What fieldtrips do you take the students on and why?

Students visit the People's History Museum in Manchester and the Co-operative Pioneers Museum in Rochdale to understand the history and culture of Chartism, Trade Unionism and Co-operation. We also visit Hebden Bridge as an example of a town where the values of the Co-operative movement continue to inspire activity.

What will the students learn from this course?

Students will not only learn about the history, ideals, values and culture of three important popular movements; they will also learn about the ways in which 'ordinary' people themselves became "the change which they wished to see in the world."

The Bront√ęs course

The Brontës

By Dr Michael Sanders

What does your course cover?

This course explores the lives and works of the Bronte sisters, with a particular focus on Charlotte Bronte's novel Jane Eyre published in 1847.  We examine the literary and historical significance of Jane Eyre as a way of understanding the enduring popularity of this novel. Please note that this course involves an intense level of reading and students are expected to have read Jane Eyre before the course begins.

What field trips will you take students on your course and why?

Students visit the Bronte Parsonage, Haworth, to get a sense not only of the lives of the Bronte sisters but also to see the local landscape which inspired so much of their writing.

What will the students learn from this course?

Students will gain an enhanced understanding of the literary significance of the Brontes and a particular understanding of the relationship between Jane Eyre and its original social and historical contexts.

From Cottonopolis to the Post-Industrial City course

From Cottonopolis to the Post-Industrial City

By Anirudha Dhanawade 

What does your course cover?

The course looks at the history of Manchester through its architecture, from the nineteenth century to the present day. We will start with the origins of industrial Manchester, exploring its iconic mill buildings as well as the diversity of its multitudinous warehouses. We’ll then think about what remains of Manchester's industrial heritage and its place in a post-industrial city that has recently been regenerated.

What fieldtrips will you take students on your course and why?

There will be 3 field trips for this course: to Ancoats (for Manchester's historic mills); to the city centre and Castlefield (for Manchester's warehouses); and to sites of ruination in Manchester (including Mayfield railway station, Hartford mill and recent empty office buildings). These trips will be an essential part of the course, giving students first-hand experience of Manchester’s rich diversity of buildings.

What will the students learn from this?

Students will learn about the key role of architecture in defining the image of a city like Manchester, from its industrial origins to the present day. They will also learn about the place of industry (and the remains of its buildings) in the post-industrial city as the well as the variety of social contexts of Manchester's buildings.

From Romanticism to Modernism course

From Romanticism to Modernism

By Dr Anne Kirkham

What does your course cover?

This course examines aspects of painting, graphics and design in Britain, Europe and America c.1780 to 1940. Drawing upon the remarkable strengths of the Manchester City Art Gallery, the Town Hall and the John Rylands Library, we will examine a range of art works and visual productions, focusing on the relationship between innovation and tradition in a period when artists and designers took inspiration from literature, history, politics, social affairs and modern life in all its forms.

What fieldtrips will you take students on your course and why?

We will visit The Lady Lever Gallery (Port Sunlight, The Walker Art Gallery (Liverpool) and the Manchester Art Gallery, all of which contain important British and European paintings, c.1780-1940.

What will the students learn from this?

By the end of this course students should be able to:

  • Identify key paintings and other forms of visual representation and contextualise them in broader debates about the purpose of art in modern life.
  • Describe the critical development of painting through key movements (Romanticism, Pre-Raphaelitism, Social Realism, Modernism).
  • Articulate their ideas in relevant assessment settings.
  • Learn to reflect on critical debates within the academic community.
  • Produce scholarly assessments (written and/or oral).
  • Outline and develop concepts in a seminar framework.
  • Engage with learning materials logically and constructively.

Medicine, Modernity and Manchester course

Medicine, Modernity and Manchester

By Dr Elizabeth Toon

What will the course cover?

The course covers the history of Western medicine from 1800 to the present, with an emphasis on changes in doctor-patient relationships and changing ideas about disease, health, mind and body. 

What field trips will you take students on your course and why?

We'll begin our trip with a visit to Manchester's Museum of Science and Industry, where we'll get an up-close look at how new ideas about sanitation, cleanliness, and safety transformed the domestic and civic landscapes of Victorian cities. Then, we'll head back to the University for a hands-on session with the University's Museum of Medicine and Health; there, we'll spend time examining medical instruments and objects used in diagnosis and treatment, surgery, cancer treatment, and childbirth, to see what we can learn from the material culture of medicine.

What will students learn from this?

Students will learn how health practices, medical care, and knowledge about the human body shaped and was shaped by social relationships, cultural change, technological innovation, and political transformation.

Britain, the Atlantic Slave Trade and Abolition course

Britain, the Atlantic Slave Trade and Abolition

By Dr Peter O'connor

This course examines the role played by the British in the development of the Atlantic slave trade and the subsequent movement to abolish the system. We will consider why slavery emerged as a defining labour system within the Atlantic World and how it influenced the development of both Britain and the Americas. We will also think about how and why slavery was abolished within the British Empire and the world at large. We will visit the International Slavery Museum in Liverpool as part of this class.

Learning outcomes

  1. An understanding of emergence of the slave trade and the role it played in British industrial development.
  2. An awareness of the debates surrounding the abolition of slavery.
  3. An understanding of contemporary debates around slavery and its place in British national identity.

Streets, Shopping and Sanitation course

Streets, Shopping and Sanitation: Everyday life in European towns, 1500-1700

By Dr James Mawdesley

This short unit will investigate everyday life within early the towns of early modern Europe. We will examine the ways in which men, women and children negotiated urban life at a time when disease was rife and life was often short, but in which there were often myriad opportunities for entertainment, be that in an ‘alehouse’ or bar, or at a fair. We will look at some of the tensions which arose as new forms of popular culture developed within the context of Europe’s changing religious situation, and we will think about the impact of migration and poverty upon urban life. We will think particularly about life in Manchester during this period, and we will spend some time looking at the area around the city’s historic Cathedral. We will also think about nearby Chester, which is one of Europe’s most complete medieval cities.

This unit will be taught via a combination of lectures and seminars, with a visit to the famous historic city of Chester on the Wednesday in which there will be the opportunity of free time for shopping and exploring.

"I did gain a lot of knowledge out of each of the modules in reference to history, economics and politics. However, the biggest highlight would be the strong friendship formed between myself and the other students from America, Canada and Brazil."

2015 Summer School student

Applying

Applications will open for the next Manchester International Summer School early in January 2017.

Entry requirements

Eligibility

To apply to the Manchester International Summer School, we expect the following:

  • You will be 18 or over on the first day of the course.
  • You will be a registered undergraduate student at a tertiary institution such as a university or college. Mature students, postgraduates and recent graduates are also welcome to apply.
  • You will have achieved good academic grades equivalent to GPA 3.0. Please contact us if you are not sure what the equivalent grade would be for your home institution.

English Language

If English is your second language, you must fulfil one of the following English language requirements:

  • Study at an institution where you are taught in English.
  • IELTS score of 6.5 (or equivalent) with a minimum of 6.0 in each skill.
  • TOEFL paper-based test minimum score of 583 with a minimum of 53 in all skills.
  • TOEFL internet-based test minimum score of 93 with minimum score of 20 in all skills.
  • TOEFL computer-based test minimum score of 213
  • English Language O-level/IGCSE/GCSE grade C.
  • International Baccalaureate Standard Level English, grade 4.
  • Cambridge Advanced Certificate grade B.
  • Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English, grade C.
  • CET-4 (China) minimum score of 493.
  • CET-6 (China) minimum score of 400.
  • TEM-4 minimum score of 70.
  • TOEIC minimum combined score of 850 for Listening and Reading.

All transcripts must be authorised by your university and your English language scores must be clearly presented in English and be no more than two years old.

We accept other forms of English language qualification. If your English language level is lower than required we will assess your personal statement and may request an additional sample of your written English.

We would be happy to consider your application or offer advice if you do not meet all of our entry requirements – please email the Summer School team to discuss your application.

Fees and finance

Tuition fee

The tuition fee for 2016 is £1,600. This covers the teaching, assessment, field trips, airport collection and selected social activities.

If you are part of a group with more than 10 students from the same institution we can offer a 10% group discount.

Accommodation fee

The accommodation fees are between £350 and £550 and cover either standard or en-suite self-catering rooms for three residential weeks. Please see the Accommodation page for further information.

Personal expenses

In addition, you will need to budget for living costs to cover food, travel and personal expenses. Manchester is a relatively affordable place to live. It is cheaper to cook yourself than eat out. All accommodation provides cooking facilities. A weekly grocery shopping is approximately £30 - £50.

Insurance

All students are required to arrange their own travel and health insurance before arriving in Manchester.

Refunds

If for any reason a student can no longer attend the Manchester International Summer School please let us know as soon as possible. A refund or partial refund of fees may be possible if notified in advance. Refund of accommodation may not be possible after the start date of the summer school.

Scholarships

Scholarships

MISS offers the following scholarships:

  • One full tuition scholarship for the duration of the summer school for a full-time undergraduate student registered in a university in Russia.
  • One full tuition scholarship for the duration of the summer school for a full-time undergraduate student registered in a university in Brazil.
  • One full tuition scholarship for the duration of the summer school for a full-time undergraduate student registered in a university in Chile.
  • One full tuition scholarship for the duration of the summer school for a full-time undergraduate student registered in a university in Indonesia.
  • These scholarships will be awarded to those who demonstrate the best academic performance in their undergraduate study together with the strongest applications. No separate application is required; decisions will be made based on the applications received.

Students applying for a scholarship must meet our entry requirements before submitting their application. You will be responsible for accommodation, travel and other expenses during your stay in Manchester.

Find out more

Please email the summer school team for further information about any of these scholarships.

How to apply

Applications will open for the 2017 Manchester International Summer School early in January 2017.

Before you apply

Please browse the course content and entry requirements before applying. 

You need to submit the following documents as part of your application before mid April 2017 (deadline to be confirmed):

  • An academic transcript from your current university
  • Proof of your English language qualification such as IELTS or TOEFL scores
  • A completed application form

Failure to include all of the required documentation will delay your application. Please see our Entry Requirements for further details.

All applications and accompanying documents should be emailed to international.summerschool@manchester.ac.uk.

Applications are considered in the order they are submitted. Any applications received after the deadline may not be successful, and students may not receive their first choice of classes.

The admission process

  • All correspondence will be via email so please check for responses regularly.
  • After you have submitted your application, you will receive an acknowledgement email within two days.
  • A decision will be made on all applications by the end of April 2017, but we may contact you earlier. If you are offered a conditional place we will send you a letter detailing your next steps.
  • Your place on the summer school is not confirmed until the course fees are paid in full. This is done via our online store using a credit or debit card. The deadline for payment will be the end of May 2017 (deadline to be confirmed).
  • You will also be asked to pay for your accommodation at this point.
  • Upon receipt of full payment, we will issue an unconditional offer letter. This will be sent via email unless you request a paper copy.
  • Further information about the course will be sent to successful students before the course starts.

Visa requirements

Not all students require a visa to enter the UK – you can check your eligibility on the Home Office website

If you do need a visa, it will usually be a Short-Term Study Visa which allows you to visit the UK for less than six months and undertake some study while here. It is not the same as a Tier 4 (General) student visa which requires a CAS number. You will be sent an unconditional offer letter which you can use for your visa application.

If you have any queries about which visa you should apply for, please visit the Home Office website or email The University of Manchester's visa office.

Accomodation

Accommodation

Details of the accommodation available in 2017 will be released early next year.

We offer a choice of standard or en-suite rooms in university halls of residence close to the teaching rooms. All rooms are grouped into self-catering apartments which share a living room and a kitchen. Included in the fee are cooking equipment, a weekly clean, and fresh bed sheets on a weekly basis.

Wireless internet is available on campus free of charge to university students, but in some bedrooms there is a wired broadband connection so students are advised to bring a laptop with them to allow a cable connection. There are also study spaces and computers available in The University of Manchester Library which students are encouraged to use.

We allocate students to their rooms in each flat to encourage a diverse mix of people from around the world, in keeping with the international experience. Therefore, you may not be placed in a flat with students from your home university.

The university campus is open to the public but patrolled by campus security.

To book additional nights before or after the summer school, you will need to check availability with the Accommodation Office. For more details, please email the Summer School team.

What to bring

We recommend bringing the following items:

  • An umbrella, as Manchester can sometimes be a rainy city!
  • A good waterproof coat, to keep you warm and dry.
  • Sturdy footwear as we’ll be walking around the city and sometimes in the countryside.
  • A backpack or daypack for carrying your belongings when on field trips.
  • Sun protection cream, a hat and sunglasses for good weather. 
  • Warm clothes such as jumpers, coats and hats for night time activities, outdoor excursions and bad weather.

If you forget anything, there are plenty of shops in the city centre where you can find all of the essential items.

Social activities

Field trips and social events

As well as field trips for each class, you will be invited to a tour of Manchester city centre, an English afternoon tea and a summer Barbecue as part of the programme with no extra cost to yourself.

Additionally we will introduce you to our current students at the University of Manchester who will accompany you on field trips and organise other social events with you such as pub quizzes, cinema and theatre visits and other local sightseeing activities. These events are optional to attend. Some may incur extra costs such as tickets.

Students at the University of Manchester will act as ambassadors and answer any questions you may have about Manchester and help you make the most of your time here and experience the city as well as a University of Manchester student would.

Free time at the weekends is allocated for independent travel and study. We strongly advise that you wait to receive the course timetable before making any travel plans.

University and city life

University and city life

The University of Manchester is centrally located in the city of Manchester. It is 20 minutes drive away from Manchester International Airport and 10 minutes away from the main train station, from which you can travel to the rest of the UK via an extensive rail network.

The University is within walking distance of the city centre and main attractions like museums, shopping centres, theatres and sports venues. The city offers a wide choice of food outlets and restaurants. We are at the doorstep of the Curry Mile, well known for its Indian/Pakistani  food. The China Town is the largest in the country with a number of Chinese, Korean and Japanese supermarkets. You can find contemporary British cuisine in Didsbury, and famous chefs run their restaurants such as Jamie Oliver and Pierre White.

Within short distance of Manchester are the beautiful national parks of the Peak District, Lake District, Lancashire, Yorkshire and Cheshire. You will find beautiful natural scenery and tranquil spots in these places. They are popular tourist attractions for British families and international tourists.

Find out more

Contact us

Get in touch with the MISS team

For any enquiries about the programme, you can contact the Manchester International Summer School Office by phone, email or post.

Postal address

Manchester International Summer School
S3.14, Samuel Alexander Building
University of Manchester
Oxford Road
Manchester
M13 9PL

We look forward to welcoming you to The University of Manchester and to our exciting city in July 2017.

Find out more

For enquiries please email: